How to Meet and Date Rich Men in Indonesia

A founding member of ASEAN and a member of the G-20 major economies, Indonesia is the world's sixteenth largest economy of the world by nominal GDP and fifteenth largest by purchasing power parity. This economic advantage together with a vibrant culture and natural beauty has made Indonesia a magnet for many of the region’s successful people. Thus whether you are visiting or a resident, the wealthy singles of Indonesia can take your social life to new heights.

Mining Barons

Although mining has always been an important sub-sector of industry in Indonesia, it gained renewed attention - both nationally and internationally - in the mid- and late 2000s when commodity prices rose significantly and when the country had more-or-less recovered from the Asian Crisis. The mining industry provides substantial export earnings, employment opportunities and other economic activities. In 2011 the mining sector contributed around 12 percent to Indonesia's GDP1. Indonesia is currently a major producer of coal, copper, gold, tin and nickel. The country remains the leading global exporter of thermal coal. In mid-1993, the Department of Mines and Energy reopened the coal sector to foreign investment, with the result that the leading Indonesian coal producer now is a joint venture between UK firms - BP and Rio Tinto. India fortune groups like Vedanta Resources and Tata Group have significant mining operations in Indonesia. the lucrative nature of the mining sector is underline by the success of Indonesian billionaires such Coal and mining magnate Low Tuck Kwong who enjoyed a net worth of $3.6 billion which made him the third richest man in Indonesia in 20122. Kwong heads the Borneo-based coal mining outfit Bayan Resources whose stock prices has tripled since its 2008 listing in Indonesia. And though you may not have access to the top billionaires of the country, keep a look out for the wealthy entrepreneurs and successful professionals of the mining sector who may prove to be generous dates.

TIP: Millionaire Match has many single millionaire men from Indonesia looking for women to date and marry.

Agricultural entrepreneurs

With its vast and abundant fertile soils Indonesia is a major global key producer of a wide variety of agricultural tropical products, and although agriculture's share of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) has declined markedly during the last five decades, it still provides income for the majority of Indonesian households today. In 2012 this sector employed around 49 million Indonesian individuals, which represents 41 percent of the total Indonesian labor force3. The large plantations tend to focus on commodities which are important export products like palm oil and rubber. This sector has also thrown up some of the richest men in the country like Martua Sitoris who with a net worth of $3 billion in 2012 was the fourth wealthiest individual in Indonesia. The source of his wealth is palm-oil and he heads Wilmar International, one of world's largest palm oil producers in the world. Even though you may not be able to meet such billionaire agricultural entrepreneurs, the wealthy farmers and plantation owners of the country can make eligible dates, if single.

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Wealthy Shoppers

In recent years, the services sector of Indonesia’s economy has shown rapid expansion and has meanwhile reached over 40% of GDP while employing one third of the work force. Of this hotel and trade contributed to 13.4% in 20094 and one of the main drivers has been the retail sector, the hub of which is in the capital city Jakarta. The city is now flush with Malls, hypermarkets and minimarkets which not only attract the wealthy locals and well-paid expat crowd but also a rising middle class. The increased purchasing power of the Indonesian middle class has led to greater spending on discretionary products, especially premium goods and international brands. Matahari Department Store which sells fashion apparel, accessories and beauty products, is now the largest company in Indonesia's retail sector while other major players are Alfa Supermarket and Hero Supermarket. Other malls in the country which attract wealthy shoppers are Plaza Indonesia, and Plaza Senayan, Senayan City, Grand Indonesia, Pacific Place, Mall of Indonesia, and Pondok Indah 2. . Ciputra World Surabaya is one of the many luxury shopping malls in Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia's 2nd tier city. Metropolitan Mall opened on 1993, is a shopping and entertainment center in Bekasi city, Indonesia. Here shops offer the latest collections from the fashion capitals of the world – Milan, London, Paris and New York – to titillate the fancy of well-to-do Indonesians and expatriates alike, and if lucky you may just strike up an acquaintance of a single shopper with deep pockets

Lucrative Tourism

The Total Number of Foreign Visitors to Indonesia in 2012 was a little over 8 million and tourism contributed about four percent to Indonesia's GDP growth5. Major ecological attractions of the country include exotic rainforests, a vast archipelago of several thousand islands and one of the longest shoreline in the world. The beaches in Bali, diving sites in Bunaken, Mount Bromo in East Java, Lake Toba and various national parks in Sumatra are just a few examples of popular scenic destinations. The ancient Prambanan and Borobudur temples, Toraja, Yogyakarta, Minangkabau, and Bali, with its many Hindu festivities, are some of the popular destinations for cultural tourism. The beaches of Bali especially are major draws for international tourists for its incredible variety, ranging from the soft silvery sand in the east coast to the wilder black sand in the west coast. While Kuta and Legian are the beaches where guests head for a waterfront party and some heavy duty fun, the quieter and prettier Jimbaran beach is the place where visitors with more exclusive tastes lounge about on the sand. All these sites are not only great places to mingle with wealthy vacationers but also ideal for getting to know the rising professionals and entrepreneurs of the tourism sector in Indonesia.

Finally head to the upscale bars and clubs of Indonesia’s biggest cities to take your social life several notches higher. To hang out with Jakarta's young, rich and beautiful, try the Red Square in the Plaza Senayan Arcadia annex, reported to be Jakarta’s first vodka bar and restaurant and which is very popular with expats in the city. X2 Club nearby is also a place to see and be seen. However if you are keen to meet discriminating guests who gather at a quiet place for a glass of fine wine, check out the Cork and Screw, a bistro and wine bar in Kuningan and another location in Plaza Indonesia. The nightlife of fashionable Kemang area in South Jakarta is popular with expats and locals alike – here Casa is a haunt for creative types, and trendy in its own restrained way. Another nightlife district popular among single expats is Blok M in South Jakarta, or more specifically Jalan Palatehan. Segarra is an outdoor lounge by the sea in the Ancol resort area of North Jakarta that is worlds away from the teeming city. In Bali you can take your pick of the swankiest resorts and its well-heeled guests. Anantara Seminyak Resort & Spa, an elegant retreat hotel situated in a prime beachfront location. Rock Bar at Ayana Resort Jimbaran is a favored destination of the poshest crowds just as Red Carpet offers an ambiance is sophisticated yet relaxed as well as one of the most comprehensive champagne selections in the place. Finally Hu’u Bar Kerobokan is the destination for well-heeled party-goers where one can find international DJs spinning on deck and which has been known to host celebrity icons Paris Hilton and Quincy Delightt Jones, Jr.

References:

  1. Indonesia Investments - Industrial Sector of Indonesia
     
  2. Forbes - The World's Billionaires
     
  3. Indonesia Investments - Agricultural Sector of Indonesia
     
  4. Switzerland Global Enterprise – Indonesia Economic Sectors [.PDF]
     
  5. Indonesia Investments - Tourism in Indonesia: One of Indonesia's Untapped Potentials? (Part I)